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Sep 9, 2013

What to Check if Your Starter Doesn't Spin When Turning the Ignition

Automobiles can be just as finicky as people when it comes to troubleshooting problems. As in people, automobiles may exhibit similar symptoms as one problem, but could be suffering from something completely different. An example of this is when you turn the ignition in your vehicle and nothing happens. No sound, no dash lights, and no clicks. What can be really aggravating is if this happens after the automobile was just running fine. What can you check to eliminate what needs to be replaced?

1. Battery - If the battery is dead, there will be no lights or sounds when turning the ignition. When your car is in operation, it is the alternator that supplies power to the automobile. If something happened to the battery during travel, this could be why it seems to be completely dead.

2. Terminal Corrosion - Corrosion on the battery terminals could prevent the automobile from getting the power it needs to turn the gear inside the starter. Cleaning the terminal with a wire brush and reattaching it could save you a visit to your mechanic. If the terminal is in bad shape, it is an easy part to replace and usually costs less than $5 in total, depending on the auto parts store you go to.

3. Solenoid - If the solenoid between the battery and the starter is bad, then the vehicle will act like there is no battery. Depending on the make and model of your vehicle, this could be an easy fix for less than $50.

4. Bad Alternator - If the alternator isn't charging the battery, then your vehicle is tapping it for power non-stop. A way to check this is to jump the vehicle or use a good battery to start it. Once your auto is running, remove the positive cable from the battery. If the automobile dies immediately, then the alternator isn't providing power. Take caution when doing this procedure for you could injure yourself greatly.

5. Ignition Switch - The ignition inside the vehicle could be bad. If turning your key doesn't complete the circuit for the starter to kick on, nothing will happen. Unfortunately, testing the ignition switch is a bit more difficult than the other troubleshooting methods. Vehicles of all kinds seem to have a personality of their own. Like people, each one has a unique feel, understanding, and operation to it. All you can really do is try to troubleshoot to the best of your abilities and hope it doesn't cost you hundreds of dollars and a tow.

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Author Bio:

Ken Myers is the founder of http://www.longhornleads.com/ has learned over the years the importance of focusing on what the customer is looking for and literally serving it to them. He doesn’t try to create a need, instead he tries to satisfy the existing demand for information on products and services.

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